Articles tagged "anthropological design"

We wake up in the morning a bit too late. Alex gets the dogs for a morning walk, while I am left to my own devices, free to ritualize at my own pace. As any new-agey intellectual, I know all about the benefits of a good morning routine. If Tim Feriss does it, it must be good, right? So I start off with a cold shower, which, you will say, does not go well with my personality. Well, it doesn't, but I try nonetheless, and it really perks me up to start the day with something that requires so much willpower. Next up, sports, meditation, journaling, writing, the list could go on until noon! What could I integrate in my home design to accommodate this lengthy (and frankly, mostly imaginary) process of self betterment? Maybe make the uneasy parts a little easier, add new potential to parts that work?

Habits form by triggering. Take a look at Charles Duhigg. He says that the loop of habit formation is: cue, routine, reward. So a sequence of triggers that keep us on track would be a good starting point. Something inviting, than lures us into doing the routine. That would be reinforced by a space that makes the routine as pleasant as possible and finally by a soothing space to get your reward.

If it's morning showers, the trigger is just waking up, so that's easy. You might consider having a well-lit, large shower, with a view to the outside, like an inside garden filled with plants. I know, it sounds dorky and expensive at the same time, but trust me, thinking stuff ahead …

10 errors to avoid when designing your sustainable home plan layout: part 5


Head bumps at the end of the staircase.

I live in such a house with my very tall boyfriend, so I speak from the heart. When drafting in 2D, some elements seem obvious, but when you build them, surprises occur: the space above the last steps of the staircase is very often the main culprits here. The trick is to simply be aware of this when drafting stairs and, if you can, draft your plans in 3D to be sure you have enough space to get upstairs. (she whispers in your ear: "come, book a session")


The bedroom is one of those essentially "yours" spaces in a home.

It's funny because, not so long ago, it used to be a pile of straw on the floor in the main room. People all slept in one big room, the same room where they spent their days as well. The one room of the house. It was easier to heat, of course, and furniture was still a sort of foreign concept. Instead, the room was empty in the middle and chairs or benches were stuck to the walls. 

We now have the luxury of private sleeping areas and we should make the most of it. 

Master bedrooms with en suite bathroom and dressing room can be pretty cool. So can tiny den-like sleeping spaces with a fantastic view. Let's see which combination might fit you. 

Here are some things to consider when designing your own bedroom.


  • Sunrise

It is one of the nicest things to start your day with. Seeing the sun getting ready for the day at the same time as me puts me in a good mood for the whole day.

You want to know where to place you bedroom windows so as to get the most out of the East morning view as possible. That means placing the bedroom on the East side of the house obviously, as well as placing the windows in such a way as to see the sun in most of the years' mornings. Note that from December to June, the sun moves a lot. A North-East view will let you see the sunrise in June, but it will be at five am! South-East is where Sun rises in the winter months at 7-8 AM. Of course, you can have windows on two sides, which …

Read part 1 here

  • TV

We all know how bad it is for our sleep to watch TV before bedtime. We associate the bed with Netflix binging. Blue light messes up our brain waves. It's plain bad. Yet we do it out of habit, like the automated monkeys we are. Ask yourself: do you really need one? If you do, you are welcome to it. Just make sure it's a conscious choice, not a reflex.


  • Morning rituals

All the things we do before the children wake up and the day starts. For years Alex used to make coffee in bed for us. It was our morning ritual. You might have tea and the newspaper on a wicker chair. You might do Yoga and meditation. Journaling.

Imagine the space that would accommodate that activity and incorporate it into your design. You might end up placing it outside the bedroom and that's fine too. Or you might not have morning rituals in which case, you're probably an alien.


  • Placement of the mighty bed

Fengshui will probably tell you that the bed must be head towards the East, or the North. I have slept in countless places in my digital nomad life. I never noticed a difference in my head position relative to the equator. If you feel the need to use that, go ahead. Another feature stands more prominently on my priority list with regards to the bed: the door. Our ancestral brain needs to know where danger is at all times. Standing with our back to the entrance makes us feel vulnerable. The same goes for desks or reading lounges.


I think that's about it. If course this list is far from …

The fashionable thing to have now in a house is glass. Lots of it. And for good reason. We have always craved for more sunshine in our houses, we just couldn't afford it. The new relationship we can have with nature, immersed in it, yet protected from the elements, is the holy Grail of dwellings.

But there's the flip of the coin: when we're surrounded by glass, our instincts tell us we're exposed, vulnerable. Our ancestors brains had a very different relationship with nature than we do. Thousands of years ago, people saw open nature with fear. Fear of the unknown, fear of the attack. Any moment they weren't careful, they could end up being dinner. The strategies they have developed in response to that constant threat have stuck with us until today, hardwired into our systems.

The most significant adaptation to the lurking threat of open nature is the dwelling, the cave, the shelter. And this shelter had to have some very specific features. Firstly, it had to protect your back. We only have eyes in front so being sure we're not possibly getting attacked from behind is key. The lookout can be focused on the front of the dwelling. There, you'd need to see as much and as far as possible, so being a bit high up is useful. But not too high up or you'll get your back out in the open again, vulnerable to the elements! Now the geography of this land you look out to is composed of some very specific things. Studies reveal that we are happiest when …

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